“A ‘brand’ is not a thing, a product, a company or an organisation. A brand does not exist in the physical world – it is a mental construct. A brand can best be described as the sum total of all human experiences, perceptions and feelings about a particular thing, product or organisation. Brands exist in the consciousness – of individuals and of the public.”

James R. Gregory, “Leveraging the Corporate Brand”.

Welcome to the exciting module of Advanced Brand Management, where you will realise that branding is an essential aspect of any business.

In fact, today, many business executives correctly recognise that the brand is ultimately one of the most valuable assets for any company. To nurture and retain the value of any brand, one should continually invest and develop the brand over time. It takes a lot of time, money and hard work to build and maintain great brands, which can speak volumes in just a few syllables.

A brand is an asset simply because:

  • It helps to set a company apart from their competition;
  • It informs customers about the business (who you are and what you are);
  • It provides direction and motivation to staff;
  • It helps customers to know what to expect from the business;
  • It represents the business and their promise to the customer;
  • It helps the business to connect emotionally with their customers; and
  • It promotes recognition that it gives the brand value.

Ultimately, what gives any company, small or large, the edge, is an effective brand strategy.

A brand is a promise to the customer and a key differentiator in a market where competition is rife. When thinking of a brand as a promise, one can simply take a look at brands such as Coca Cola, McDonalds, Wimpy, Nandos and Apple, and you will immediately know what they promise. In other words, you know what you are going to get.

At a basic level a brand consists of a specific combination of elements, including a logo, promise, personality, look, voice, words, type font, design, colours, price, service, and so on.

Brands are almost magicalbecause they have an ability to achieve loyalty and create a competitive edge. This module will provide you with key brand insights and an opportunity to gain knowledge by addressing key questions such as:

  • Why are brands important?
  • What do brands represent to consumers? and
  • What should companies do to effectively manage their brands?

The study of brands and branding is an evolving and exciting journey. Our objective is to guide you along this journey by equipping you with insights that will stand you in good stead when you continue on your career path. Enjoy the brand journey; it’s an exciting, ever evolving and colourful exploration.

A brief summary of this module

Below is a brief summary of each module’s content to provide you with a bigger picture from the start, so that you can see how all the components come together, as covered in the learner guide, as well as the prescribed textbook.

Section 1: Opening perspective – Brand and Brand Management

You will get to understand what defines a brand, and what the functions of a brand are (from both a consumer and company perspective). You will also gain insight into what one can and cannot brand. The concept of brand equity and the strategic brand management process is also introduced in this section. You will get to explore important issues in terms of planning, implementing and evaluating brand strategies, and, lastly, understand how to make better branding decisions by making use of appropriate concepts, theories, models and other tools.

Section 2 – Developing a Brand Strategy

This section exposes you to the various components of branding. Specific attention is given to the importance of customer-brand equity, and to the role of brand identity, brand positioning and brand differentiation in strengthening brand equity. Brand valuation also forms a key component of this section.

Section 3 – Designing and Implementing Brand Marketing Programmes

This section focuses on choosing brand elements (sometimes referred to as brand identity), which build brand equity. Product, pricing and distribution strategies are explored in the context of how they build brand equity. An overview is given of the new perspectives of marketing, and the concept of integrated marketing, while how to develop an integrated

marketing communication programme, is also explored. The new media environment is addressed, as well as the major marketing communication options, which are available to marketers today. The last part of this section concludes with considering the different means by which marketers can leverage secondary brand associations.

Section 4 – Measuring and Interpreting Brand Performance

This section details what consumers know, and how they feel about and act towards brands, and how marketers can develop measurement procedures to assess how well their brands are doing. The customer-based equity concept provides guidance about how to measure brand equity. Research methods that measure outcomes are also explored in addition to conducting brand audits, designing brand tracking studies and establishing a brand equity management system

Section 5 – Growing and Sustaining Brand Equity

This section takes a broader perspective and considers how to sustain, nurture, and grow brand equity amidst various situations and circumstances. Understanding and developingbrand architecture is reviewed, as well as brand hierarchies and corporate branding. This section also considers the role of product strategy in creating, maintaining and enhancing brand equity, with specific emphasis on the introduction and naming of new products and brand extensions. A key component of this section is understanding how to manage brands over time, as well as managing brand equity in different types of market segments. International issues and global branding strategies are also reviewed.

Section 6 – Closing Perspectives

The final section provides some closing observations about strategic brand management. This includes a review of the customer-based brand equity framework, managerial guidelines and key themes that have emerged from the previous sections, as well as a summary of some of branding’s success factors.


Assessment

  • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
  • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

Welcome to the exciting world of digital marketing, an important discipline within the broad field of marketing. Digital marketing is a dynamic field which goes beyond e-commerce to explore the entire marketing process in the online arena. Digital channels can be used to create online market-spaces while new technology allows firms to connect with their customers through electronic platforms. Self-service technologies offer new and cheaper means of creating customer satisfaction. Digital marketing must be integrated with the overall marketing strategy of the firm. It can be used to augment a traditional marketing strategy or to create pure online businesses. When moving into digital marketing many firms tend to examine their business processes which may be re-designed to unlock new sources of value for customers.

The terms digital marketing and e-marketing are used interchangeably. Many advertising agencies use the term digital marketing or digital strategy to refer to the use of digital technology in marketing communications.

This module on digital marketing will provide an overview of the digital marketing function. It will enable you to understand how to add value to a business through the use of digital marketing. Given that almost every firm has a website and that many firms are using their websites for more business and customer functions it is critical for those in the marketing field to be familiar with digital marketing. This module will provide you with the knowledge to design a digital marketing strategy. The linkage of the digital marketing strategy with offline marketing (where this is applicable) will also be covered.

Assessment

  • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
  • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

Welcome to the exciting world of global marketing, an important discipline within the broad field of marketing. Global marketing has not only gained status as a discipline in management science, but it has also gained wide acceptance as a critical area in marketing the products and services of global marketers in markets across the world.

The task of global marketing is to generate accurate information regarding the global marketing environment for marketers to plan their marketing strategies and market their products and services across the world. Based on the information generated, the discipline of global marketing also guides marketers in developing competitive strategies to enable them to compete successfully in markets across the world. The discipline also guides marketers in developing global marketing strategies and it furthermore provides insight into the management of global operations.

The module of Advanced Global Marketing will hopefully give you the critical knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in the global marketing sector. On completion of the module, you will have an exhaustive knowledge of marketing in the global context that will complement the knowledge you gained on domestic marketing during previous learning.

Globalization and the effects of this phenomenon demand an adjusted perspective of the marketing function. This module will expose you to some of the newest thinking in this field. The Conference of Bretton Woods took place in 1944 and ushered in an era of global thinking in business with the establishment of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. These structures had as their primary aim the promotion of international cooperation and development between the Allied nations following the Second World War but it served the additional function of promoting trade links and initiating de-territorialization (Kale and Sangita 2013) or the abolishment of national borders in trading and commerce.

The symbiotic relationship between the USA and Britain during the leadership era of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan gave new impetus to the globalization trends which we nowadays see as a fact of life. As the iron curtain came crashing down, there was no stopping the trends of global reach.

Whereas social and cultural practices were very much embedded in specific regions and territories a few decades ago, the marketer of today cannot rely on the use of cultural assumptions in creating the marketing message anymore. The lines separating cultures and associated practices have been blurred and globalization demands a new perspective and approach from marketers and their products to give recognition to this fact.

As you will see in the course of this module, global marketing and the fact that the world is becoming ever more globalised open great career opportunities to qualified individuals. Those with global marketing knowledge and skills can work literally anywhere in the world and can apply the basics of global marketing in literally any market under any conditions. Advanced Global Marketing will lay the foundation for you to fulfil any of these roles, as two of our alumni will explain below

Assessment

  • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
  • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

Welcome to the challenging yet exciting world of the Advanced Marketing Practicum. Whether you have registered for the AMPP401 module (for Postgraduate Diploma studies) or the AMP401 module (for BPhil Honours studies) you will need to complete this work-integrated module which we refer to as the practicum. The practicum is aimed at the integration of theoretical learning with fieldwork in marketing; in other words solidifying theoretical learning within a marketing setting. It is also aimed at helping you to identify areas of personal growth as a marketing professional. The practicum is available in two formats depending on the IMM Graduate School programme that you are registered for. The AMPP401 is the practicum module code for the Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management and the AMP401 is the practicum module code for the Bachelor of Philosophy Honours in Marketing Management (BPhil Hons). It is important to note that both these module codes share the work-integrated learning approach and for both these modules you will be following the instructions held within this learner guide, but if you are registered for the AMPP401 you will be required to complete an additional project. The process for successful completion of your practicum for either of these modules is clearly outlined in this learner guide, which you should regard as your ‘manual pro Practicum’ (Practicum Manual). What is work-integrated learning? According to Cooper et al, (2010), work-integrated learning is that point at which theory and practice intersect, a time in which you will be required to use various sources of theoretical and introspective knowledge in a practical workplace setting. The practicum is a form of work-integrated learning for the reason that you will be drawing on theory you have previously learnt and applying that to work that you would typically need to complete in the workplace setting. Such learning is also sometimes referred to as fieldwork.

The theoretical learning that you have encountered in the course of your studies will have introduced you to many concepts, practical thoughts, theories and frameworks around marketing and its many aspects, such as brand management, strategic marketing and digital or global marketing (depending on your module choices). There comes a time when all that accumulated theoretical knowledge needs to take on a life of its own in a tangible, practical way; this is that time. The practicum requires that you integrate previously learnt theory in such a way that you demonstrate a clear understanding of theoretical implications on the marketing realities of a living, breathing entity in the business world, i.e. your host company. The host company you work at, may not be your current employer. (Options are discussed in this learner guide.) In this learner guide you will find the structural layout for the report and appendices that you will be required to complete in order to be successful in this module. The practicum module measures your ability to translate theory and reflective thought into practice. You will be asked to consider the many aspects of marketing as you design a way forward for your host company. You will then be measured on the practical approaches that you take and how you have substantiated or argued these in your reports. You may expect this module to be challenging and possibly consume much of your life over the semester as you seek to understand each experience in terms of what it would mean, both practically and strategically, to your host company. Time management will be critical and therefore the reports required are not something that you want to try to tackle ‘at the last minute’. If you have been working in the field of marketing for a while, you will possibly approach this module with the sense that it cannot teach you anything, but you would be mistaken in that assumption since you will find that this module stretches you to step outside your comfort zone in terms of how you have always done things. If you are at the early stages of your career you may initially feel overwhelmed, but remember that you have reached this point by working through the necessary body of work and you are now simply being challenged to apply all you have learnt.

You will need to use your communication, negotiation and relationship building skills to network with people in your host company, in an almost consultancy type of role and herein lies the power of the practicum; whether you have been working in the field of marketing or are new to it, the nature of the academic tasks required may knock on or even open new doors for you in the working world. When you reach the end, you will no doubt find that it has been a valuable personal branding tool which you could have used to position yourself as a marketing professional either with your current employer or as a marketing professional starting out. The academic requirements laid out in this learner guide will force you to work alongside some of your host company’s decision makers; asking questions, listening, and exploring options. We hope that you will use this opportunity to become an ambassador for the profession of marketing.

Good luck with your studies

Assessment

  • Project (Assignment): counts to 100 % of your overall module score
  • No Examination for this module.
AMP401: For students registered for the BPhil (Hons) in Marketing Management

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

Welcome to the challenging yet exciting world of the Advanced Marketing Practicum. Whether you have registered for the AMPP401 module (for Postgraduate Diploma studies) or the AMP401 module (for BPhil Honours studies) you will need to complete this work-integrated module which we refer to as the practicum. The practicum is aimed at the integration of theoretical learning with fieldwork in marketing; in other words solidifying theoretical learning within a marketing setting. It is also aimed at helping you to identify areas of personal growth as a marketing professional. The practicum is available in two formats depending on the IMM Graduate School programme that you are registered for. The AMPP401 is the practicum module code for the Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management and the AMP401 is the practicum module code for the Bachelor of Philosophy Honours in Marketing Management (BPhil Hons). It is important to note that both these module codes share the work-integrated learning approach and for both these modules you will be following the instructions held within this learner guide, but if you are registered for the AMPP401 you will be required to complete an additional project. The process for successful completion of your practicum for either of these modules is clearly outlined in this learner guide, which you should regard as your ‘manual pro Practicum’ (Practicum Manual). What is work-integrated learning? According to Cooper et al, (2010), work-integrated learning is that point at which theory and practice intersect, a time in which you will be required to use various sources of theoretical and introspective knowledge in a practical workplace setting. The practicum is a form of work-integrated learning for the reason that you will be drawing on theory you have previously learnt and applying that to work that you would typically need to complete in the workplace setting. Such learning is also sometimes referred to as fieldwork.


The theoretical learning that you have encountered in the course of your studies will have introduced you to many concepts, practical thoughts, theories and frameworks around marketing and its many aspects, such as brand management, strategic marketing and digital or global marketing (depending on your module choices). There comes a time when all that accumulated theoretical knowledge needs to take on a life of its own in a tangible, practical way; this is that time. The practicum requires that you integrate previously learnt theory in such a way that you demonstrate a clear understanding of theoretical implications on the marketing realities of a living, breathing entity in the business world, i.e. your host company. The host company you work at, may not be your current employer. (Options are discussed in this learner guide.) In this learner guide you will find the structural layout for the report and appendices that you will be required to complete in order to be successful in this module. The practicum module measures your ability to translate theory and reflective thought into practice. You will be asked to consider the many aspects of marketing as you design a way forward for your host company. You will then be measured on the practical approaches that you take and how you have substantiated or argued these in your reports. You may expect this module to be challenging and possibly consume much of your life over the semester as you seek to understand each experience in terms of what it would mean, both practically and strategically, to your host company. Time management will be critical and therefore the reports required are not something that you want to try to tackle ‘at the last minute’. If you have been working in the field of marketing for a while, you will possibly approach this module with the sense that it cannot teach you anything, but you would be mistaken in that assumption since you will find that this module stretches you to step outside your comfort zone in terms of how you have always done things. If you are at the early stages of your career you may initially feel overwhelmed, but remember that you have reached this point by working through the necessary body of work and you are now simply being challenged to apply all you have learnt.


You will need to use your communication, negotiation and relationship building skills to network with people in your host company, in an almost consultancy type of role and herein lies the power of the practicum; whether you have been working in the field of marketing or are new to it, the nature of the academic tasks required may knock on or even open new doors for you in the working world. When you reach the end, you will no doubt find that it has been a valuable personal branding tool which you could have used to position yourself as a marketing professional either with your current employer or as a marketing professional starting out. The academic requirements laid out in this learner guide will force you to work alongside some of your host company’s decision makers; asking questions, listening, and exploring options. We hope that you will use this opportunity to become an ambassador for the profession of marketing.

Good luck with your studies

Assessment

  • Project (Assignment): counts to 100 % of your overall module score
  • No Examination for this module
AMPP401: for students registered for the Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing Management

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

Welcome to Advanced Marketing Research: Theory 4 (AMRT401). Hopefully this will be an enriching journey into the world of marketing research. Many of you have already been exposed to marketing or business research in your undergraduate programmes and you will therefore understand that marketing research is a critical tool in generating information for effective marketing and business decision-making.

The required information is often used to design a broad marketing strategy and/or a more specific product launch strategy. The information gathered can also be used to assist in identifying marketing opportunities and threats, formulating marketing plans and actions, as well as evaluating and improving overall marketing performance.

This module of marketing research theory has a specific objective which is to provide you with the theoretical skills to fully understand the research process. These skills will assist you when you finally start with the development of an Advanced Marketing Research: Report 4 (AMRR402).

It is important to remember that undertaking a research project however, necessitates a commitment of time and resources, two premium commodities in today’s busy world. Marketing research, based on solid theoretical grounds, circumvents the misuse of time and resources and consequently Advanced Marketing Research: Theory 4 (AMRT401) plays a very important role in the marketing research process.

On completion of this module, you will be well poised to start your research project (AMRR402) with a high level of understanding as to what you want to research, how to approach it and how to conduct it. Advanced Marketing Research: Theory 4 (AMRT401) and Advanced Marketing Research: Report 4 (AMRR402) work hand-in-hand to provide the academic requirements for a professionally qualified marketing researcher.

Marketing research provides an all-encompassing view of marketing theory and practice. There are great marketing research career opportunities available to qualified people. In terms of research specialists, marketers not only work with people within their companies but also with people who are involved with processes outside their organisations. Many marketing divisions will employ in-house people such as a market researcher, data support analyst, market research analyst or market research manager to fulfil specialist functions. There is a trend in companies to also appoint specialists such as a corporate researcher or brand researcher. This module in marketing research theory will lay the foundation for you to fulfil any of these roles. As marketing research is often outsourced to specialist companies, this module also makes provision for such scenarios, i.e. establishing criteria for critically reviewing research proposals.

This is a post-graduate module and you are expected to exercise considerable independence in your studies. You are therefore urged to work through problems to find your own solutions. In the workplace you will often be required to work independently, and the research modules will provide you with a good start towards this direction. An example of the independence required, will be your ability to synthesise what you have learnt in other modules.

The IMM Graduate School also offers a Student Support Service through the Postgraduate Support Administrator. If you have exhausted your own solution-finding ability then contact the Postgraduate Administrator at academic-pg@immgsm.ac.za for help. The administrator will, however, teach you to fish rather than provide you with fish.

Good luck.

Assessment

  • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
  • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module

You have already been exposed to the exciting world of marketing research. Welcome now to the module that synthesises what you have learnt and culminates in a research report. Many of you have already been exposed to marketing, supply chain or business research in your undergraduate programmes and you will by now therefore understand that marketing research is a critical tool to generate information for effective business decision making. The required information is often used to design a broad marketing strategy and/or a more specific product launch strategy. The collected information can also be used to assist in identifying marketing opportunities and threats, formulating marketing plans and actions, and evaluating and improving overall marketing performance. The Advanced Marketing Research: Report 4 (AMRR402) is the practical application of all your past studies and covers more than just your previous research modules as it requires you to integrate your marketing and business theories.

This module, Advanced Marketing Research: Report 4 (AMRR402), has a specific objective and that is to document a research report.

On completion of this module, you will be well-poised to contribute meaningfully in any marketing or marketing research department. If you are specifically interested in a marketing research career then further studies to fine-tune your research skills are recommended.

There are great marketing research career opportunities available to qualified persons and marketing research provides that all-round view of marketing theory and practice. Marketers work not only within their companies but are also involved with processes outside their organisations. Many marketing divisions will employ in-house people such as a market researcher, data support analyst, market research analyst or market research manager to fulfil specialist functions. However, lately, companies also appoint specialists such as a corporate researcher or brand researcher. The module in marketing research will lay the foundation for you to fulfil any of these roles.

We hope that you will enjoy this module (AMRR402) and successfully move on to a career in marketing and/or marketing research.

This module is a postgraduate module, and you are expected to exercise considerable independence in your studies. You are therefore urged to work through problems to find solutions. In the workplace you will often be required to work independently, thus the research modules will provide you with a good start in this direction.

An example of the independence required here would be your ability to synthesise what you have learnt in other modules. You should therefore be able to apply the lessons learnt in those modules to developing your research report. This is not an examination module and thus you cannot wait until the end and then cram information in order to pass. Students who are successful in this module are those who start immediately.

The IMM Graduate School also offers a student support service through the student support administrator, so if you have exhausted your own solution-finding ability then do contact the postgraduate administrator for help.

Good luck.

Assessment:

  • Research Report (Assignment): counts to 100 % of your overall module score
  • No Examination for this module

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module


Welcome to the exciting world of advanced services marketing - important discipline within the broad field of marketing. This module will provide you with an understanding of the vital role that services play in the business environment. After completion of this module, you will be able to understand the importance of services within businesses, and implement and develop strategies which can aid businesses in improving their overall service level and recover from service failures.
The foundation of this module is the recognition that services present special challenges that must be identified and addressed. Issues commonly encountered in service organisations – the inability to inventory, the difficulty in synchronizing demand and supply, and challenges in controlling the performance quality of human interactions – need to be articulated and tackled by managers. Many of the strategies include information and approaches that are new to marketing. The module aims to help students and managers understand and address these special challenges of services marketing.
The development of strong customer relationships through quality service (and services) are at the heart of this module’s content. The topics covered are equally applicable to organisations whose core product is service (such as banks, transportation companies, hotels, hospitals, educational institutions, professional services and telecommunication) and to organisations that depend on service excellence for competitive advantage such as high-technology manufacturers and automotive and industrial products.
The prescribed material will focus on the knowledge required to implement service strategies for competitive advantage across industries. Included are frameworks for customer-focused management, and strategies for increasing customer satisfaction and retention through service. In addition to standard marketing topics (such as pricing), the material introduces students to topics that include management and measurement of service quality, service recovery, the linking of customer management to performance measurement, service blueprinting, customer co-production, and cross-functional treatment of issues through integration of marketing, and disciplines such as operations and human resources. Each of these topics represents pivotal content for tomorrow’s businesses as they are structured around process rather than task, engage in one-to-one marketing, mass customise their offerings, and attempt to build strong relationships with their customers.
If you do not want to pursue a formal marketing management career, the module will still be of great value to you as it will supply you with insights into understanding the world of business, and the positioning of services. Ultimately, it will assist you in making better informed and less risky decisions.

Assessment:

  • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
  • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module


Welcome to the exciting world of Strategic Marketing, an important discipline within the broad field of marketing.  Strategic Marketing has not only gained status as a science discipline, but it has gained wide acceptance as a critical element of effective business decision-making.
Key ingredients of the marketing management process are insightful, creative marketing strategies and plans that can guide marketing activities. Developing the right marketing strategy over time requires a blend of discipline and flexibility. Firms must stick to a strategy but also find new ways to constantly improve it. Increasingly, marketing must also develop strategies for a range of products and services within the organization. As a highly successful business-to-business marketer, Siemens for instance, must continually design and implement marketing activities at many levels and for many units of the organization.
Successful marketing requires companies to have capabilities such as:

  • understanding customer value,
  • creating customer value, 
  • delivering customer value, 
  • capturing customer value, and
  • sustaining customer value.  

Only a select group of companies stand out as master marketers: Procter & Gamble, Southwest Airlines, Nike, Sony, Toyota, Samsung, Cannon, Disney, Nordstrom, Barnes & Noble, Starbucks, Wal-Mart, IKEA, Club Med, Bang & Olufsen, Electrolux, Nokia, Lego, Tesco, Virgin, Target, Enterprise Rent-ACar, Progressive Insurance, McDonald's and Ritz-Carlton. "Breakthrough Marketing: Intel" describes how that company created customer value and built a brand in a category for which most people thought branding impossible.
These companies focus on the customer and are organised to respond effectively to changing customer needs. They all have well-staffed marketing departments, and all their other departments accept the concept that the customer is king. To ensure that they select and execute the right activities, marketers must give priority to strategic planning in three key areas: 

  • managing a company's businesses as an investment portfolio, 
  • assessing each business's strength by considering the market's growth rate and the company's position and fit in that market, and 
  • establishing a strategy. 

    For each business, the company must develop a game plan for achieving its long-run objectives. Most large companies consist of four organisational levels: 

    • the corporate level, 
    • the division level, 
    • the business unit level, and 
    • the product level. 

    Corporate headquarters is responsible for designing a corporate strategic plan to guide the whole enterprise; it makes decisions on the amount of resources to allocate to each division, as well as on which businesses to start or eliminate. Each division establishes a plan covering the allocation of funds to each business unit within the division. 
    Each business unit develops a strategic plan to carry that business unit into a profitable future. Finally, each product level (product line, brand) within a business unit develops a marketing plan for achieving its objectives in its product market.

    • The marketing plan is the central instrument for directing and coordinating the marketing effort. The marketing plan operates at two levels: strategic and tactical. 
    • The strategic marketing plan lays out the target markets and the value proposition the firm will offer, based on an analysis of the best market opportunities. 
    • The tactical marketing plan specifies the marketing tactics, including product features, promotion, merchandising, pricing, sales channels, and service. 

    Today, teams develop the marketing plan with inputs and sign-offs from every important function. Management then implements these plans at the appropriate levels of the organisation, monitors results, and takes necessary corrective action. 
    This module of Advanced Strategic Marketing  is a postgraduate course which will hopefully give you the critical knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in the marketing sector.  On completion of the module, you will have an exhaustive knowledge of the strategic marketing process, which will enable you to undertake strategic marketing yourself or to manage a strategic marketing process. .
    If you do not want to pursue a formal marketing management career, the module will still be of great value to you as it will supply you with insights of understanding the world of business, and the positioning of brands, products and services.  Ultimately, it will assist you in making better informed and less risky decisions.  

    Assessment:

    • Assignment: counts to 20 % of your overall module score
    • Examination: counts to 80% of your overall module score

    See the Yearbook for Syllabi outline of each module